Tag Archives: Harvard blogs

The five best and worst sites, Part V

Cluetrain Manifesto

Focus: Connections, design, serendipity, and a long, long tail

The best: Dan Gillmor’s blog. This site appears to be Gillmor’s personal space, not associated with the Center for Citizen Media. It answered a big question for me this morning, and sent me on some serendipitous rabbit trails.

The tale starts with a “404 Not Found” message at the Center for Citizen Media. I searched Google for Gillmor to see whether he had suddenly disappeared from the Internet, found his blog, and got my answer that the Center’s site was down. That in itself is a good lesson for bloggers who are hosted somewhere else: Have a findable backup place where you can tell your readers what’s going on. They’ll love you for it.
Gillmor’s personal site’s serendipity then sent me to some interesting places, past and present:
Doc Searls weblog: This early web visionary is alive and well and sharing through a Harvard blog. He’s a fellow with the Berkman Center and has focused on business and the web for years.
His site led me to the Cluetrain Manifesto, a place I had not been in years. This manifesto, circa 1999, speaks louder than ever at a time when many people are ringing their hands about the state of business and the Internet, especially the media business.
Then on to Harvard blogs, a place where many smart people are writing.
Then on to Reflections from Beijing, a place that has not forgotten about Burma. The region’s woes might have fallen off the radar of big media quickly, but the issue of communication access there and in China remains a high priority for some big brains, young and old.

The best worst (warning: turn down your sound before you click): The World’s Worst Website.
It speaks for itself.

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